• 22 S. State St. Clearfield, UT 84015
  • Main : (801) 525-5000
  • M-F 8am to 5pm

Frequently Asked Questions


YELLOW PHASE GUIDANCE QUESTIONS


A: Travel recommendations include: limit unnecessary travel; follow CDC travel health information guidelines: https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel; and self-quarantining for (14 days) when returning from high-risk areas.

Davis County follows Utah's travel guidelines. Currently there are no state requirements to quarantine  upon returning to Utah after traveling out of state. 

 

A: Low risk public health guidance should be followed.

  • Maintain social distancing when in public settings

  • Wear face coverings when social distancing is difficult to maintain

  • Gatherings up to 50 if needed; smaller groups still preferred

  • Limit out-of-state travel

  • Symptom check before engaging in close contact

  • High-risk individuals continue to follow "orange" guidelines

A: 

  • Social gatherings increased from 20 to 50 or fewer while maintaining 6-foot distance

  • Schools anticipated to reopen for 20-21 school year; increased cleaning & hygiene regimen; additional guidance to be provided by State Board of Education

  • Playgrounds are open; limit child interaction with others in public spaces

  • Pools can open at reduced capacity; social distancing to be maintained between households

  • Mask requirements & recommendations remain the same

A: High-risk individuals should continue to take extra precautions. When visiting friends or family, everyone should wear a face covering. Limit social gatherings with people outside of your household. Limit physical interactions with other high-risk individuals.

High-risk individuals who live at home and are struggling to meet basic needs can call 801-525-5050, Option 5 for help with meals, delivery of needed items, medical transportation, or overcoming other challenges that prevent them from staying safe.

A: The decision was made using data.Some of the measures that help us with these decisions include:

  • Plateau in the number of average weekly cases of COVID-19

  • Testing is available for all who have symptoms

  • Personal protective equipment is available

  • Hospitals have capacity to serve COVID-19 & non-COVID-19 patients

  • The health department has capacity to investigate all positive cases & actively monitor those at-risk for symptoms

 

A:  For the general public, masks or other face coverings (e.g., scarf, gaiter, bandana) should be worn in public settings where other physical distancing measures are difficult to maintain, such as being closer than 6 feet to other people. 

For businesses, employees and patrons should wear masks or face coverings when it is difficult or impossible to maintain 6-foot distance. 

Some industries have additional mask requirements. For example, employees helping with dine-in services at restaurants are required to wear masks, employees and patrons of personal services, such as salons and spas, are required to wear a mask (with an exception when the mask interferes with service), and employees working at gyms are required to wear a mask when working within 6 feet of patrons. For additional guidelines, visit:  Utah Leads Together Phased Guidelines.

Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under the age of 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated, or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance. 

To learn more about how to properly wear a mask or to make a cloth mask, visit: CDC Cloth Face Coverings

 


Gathering QUESTIONS


A: Physical distancing means to avoid gathering in groups of people and to keep a safe distance, at least six feet away, from others. Avoiding close physical contact (social distancing) is the single most important thing everyone can do to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

A: Gatherings can be groups up to 50 if needed. Smaller groups are  still preferred. Maintain 6-foot physical distance when in public settings. Wear face coverings when physical distance is difficult to maintain. High-risk individuals should limit gatherings outside of their household.

 

A: Yes, a group of family and friends (50 or fewer) may attend family gatherings including weddings, funerals, and religious ceremonies.

A: During this time, limiting interactions among children is encouraged. However, each family is in a position to assess their risk, consider protective measures, and choose whether or not to enter into a situation.

A: Yes, religious services can be held as long as a 6-foot distance is maintained between each household group attending. Additional recommendations for returning to in-person religious services can be found in Appendix B (page 24) of the  Utah Leads Together Phased Guidelines.

 

A: At the present time, the Health Department will not be able to support any public gathering. Therefore, no Temporary Mass Gathering permits will be issued until further notice. Refunds are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Please submit your request in writing to the Environmental Health Services Division of the Davis County Health Department.

A: Yes. The Utah Department of Health released guidance including steps toward re-socialization of residents living in assisted living facilities. The policy is limited to Assisted Living facilities, Types I and II. The guidance allows for up to 2 visitors for up to 30 minutes who follow all recommended precautions. Facilities will develop policies to align and comply with state guidance. State guidance can be found here: https://coronavirus-download.utah.gov/Health/COVID-19_Guidance_for_Visitors_in_Assisted_Living.pdf

 


BUSINESS QUESTIONS


A: During this time, it is important to prioritize health and safety for your employees and the public. Do not allow sick employees to come to work. Continue to encourage working remotely when possible. Practice physical distancing by avoiding any gatherings and keeping 6 feet away from others. Continue to protect high-risk individuals. Follow all other recommended guidelines, including wearing face coverings, practicing good hygiene, and regular cleaning. 

A: There are not specific guidelines of how often a surface needs to be cleaned or sanitized, as this depends on many variables. The general guideline is that surfaces should be cleaned and sanitized frequently and regularly. 

The cleaning schedule should be specific to each location based on the number of people that pass through and what surfaces are frequently touched. The National Institutes of Health has conducted some testing and have found that COVID-19 can remain in the air as long as 2-3 hours. Once it has settled on a surface it has survived on cardboard up to 24 hours and on plastics and stainless steel for 2-3 days.

For more information on how to properly sanitize your workplace, visit: CDC Cleaning and Disinfecting Your Facility.

Reopening guidance for cleaning and disinfecting public spaces, workplaces, businesses, schools, and homes, can be found at: CDC Reopening Guidance for Cleaning and Disinfecting Public Spaces, Workplaces, Businesses, Schools, and Homes.

A: Dental offices should follow all recommendations from the Utah Dental Association at: www.uda.org.
A: Low-interest and no-interest loans have been made available to small businesses as part of the state and federal government response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Business owners impacted can visit sba.gov/disaster, coronavirus.utah.gov/business, or reach out directly to Rob Sant, the Division Director for Davis County Economic Development. Rob can be reached at: 801-451-3216 or rsant@co.davis.ut.us.
A: Yes. Personal services are open under strict hygiene protocols. Service providers and clients must wear face coverings or masks, unless the face covering or mask interferes with the service. Both employees and clients should be screened for symptoms. Anyone who is sick cannot come to work or receive services. When services are not being directly provided, 6 feet of physical distance must be maintained; this includes in waiting areas and between clients at all times.
A:

The state maintains a spreadsheet that lists Utah vendors for personal protective equipment (PPE) like masks, sanitizer and disinfectant. If you’re a Utah organization in need of PPE for your workforce or on-site visitors, we encourage you to reach out to other Utah companies that can provide those products. View the spreadsheet here.

Additional resources for worksites can be found here: https://coronavirus.utah.gov/business/workplace-resources/

A: Employers should work with high-risk employees to make reasonable accommodations that enable the high-risk individual to maintain employment in a safe manner, such as:

  • Minimize face-to-face contact
  • Assign tasks that allow for a 6-foot distance from others
  • Implement flexible work hours or staggered shifts
  • Allow high-risk individuals to work remotely
Guidance Documents:

FOOD ESTABLISHMENTS/FOOD-RELATED QUESTIONS


A: Limited dine-in is now allowed. However, takeout and delivery are still encouraged. 

When dining-in, stay 6 feet away from other parties. Do not dine-in if you are sick or have been living with someone who is sick. Establishments can choose if they will open dine-in or continue to limit services. 

For more information see Food Establishment Guidance.

A: Buffets and bars are permitted to open, as long as all dine-in guidelines for food establishments are followed. 

A: We recommend contactless payments. If contactless payment is not possible, disinfect transaction terminal between customers. Staff that handle payments must sanitize hands between handling payment options and food/containers.

A: At the present time, no Temporary Food Establishment permits will be issued until further notice. Refunds are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Please submit your request in writing to the Environmental Health Services Division of the Davis County Health Department.

OUTDOOR, RECREATION, AND FITNESS QUESTIONS


A:  Yes, please do! We highly encourage physical activity for your overall well-being. Just stay 6 feet away from others and avoid meeting in groups. Do not congregate at trailheads, parks, or other outdoor spaces. Do not touch high-touch surfaces, including handrails, trail signs, and maps. If visiting a state or national park please follow all of their guidelines.

If engaging in close-contact or team sports all participants should have symptoms checked prior to every practice or competition and should not compete if sick. Also, spectators should wear face coverings when physical distancing guidelines are difficult to maintain.

A: Yes. Playgrounds are open; limit interactions among children.

A: Yes, individuals and members of their household may visit trails, but must use physical distancing practices by staying 6 feet away from other people not living in their same household, at all times. Individuals should not gather at trailheads or other outdoor spaces.

A: Yes, but maintain physical distancing between households.

  • Open plunge may open at a reduced capacity

  • Lap swimming resumes to normal capacity

  • Physical distancing to be maintained between households in common areas

  • Swim teams and swim lessons are allowed as long as physical distancing is allowed on pool deck

  • Maintain signage that encourages physical distancing at all times

  • Lifeguard training is now allowed

A: Gyms can open with the following guidelines in place: 

  • Maintain 10 feet of distance between those not living in your household

  • Symptom check before engaging in sporting activities

  • Provide disinfectant supplies and post signs encouraging patrons to thoroughly disinfect equipment after use

A: Yes. Check for COVID-19 symptoms before playing. Don’t play when sick.

  • All participants should have symptoms checked prior to every practice or competition

  • Spectators should wear face coverings when social distancing guidelines are difficult to maintain

 


ENVIRONMENTAL QUESTIONS


A: For information on how to clean and disinfect your facility, visit: CDC Cleaning and Disinfecting Your Facility.

Guidance specific to community facilities can be found at: CDC Cleaning and Disinfection for Community Facilities.

Reopening guidance for cleaning and disinfecting public spaces, workplaces, businesses, schools, and homes, can be found at: CDC Reopening Guidance for Cleaning and Disinfecting Public Spaces, Workplaces, Businesses, Schools, and Homes.

 

A: Yes. COVID-19 has not been detected in drinking water. Davis County water systems use water treatment methods including filtration and disinfection which effectively remove or inactivate the virus that causes COVID-19.  All water systems personnel will continue to conduct routine sampling with oversight sampling from the Davis County Health Department.
A: At this time, the risk of transmission of the virus that causes COVID-19 through sewage systems is believed to be low. Although transmission of COVID-19 through sewage may be possible, there is no evidence to date that this has occurred. There are inherent dangers with any sewer water contact. This guidance will be updated as necessary as new evidence is assessed.
A: Wastewater treatment plant operations should ensure workers follow routine practices to prevent exposure to wastewater. These include using engineering and administrative controls, safe work practices, and PPE normally required for work tasks when handling untreated wastewater. No additional COVID-19–specific protections are recommended for employees involved in wastewater management operations, including those at wastewater treatment facilities.

TESTING QUESTIONS


A: There are several testing locations in Davis County. Visit: coronavirus.utah.gov/utah-covid-19-testing-locations/ to find a location near you. You can also contact your healthcare provider.
A: The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, or HIPAA, for short, is a law meant to protect your health information and make sure you have access to it.  You are never required to disclose your current health status to anyone but your healthcare provider or local health department.

A: There is still a lot we don't know about COVID-19 including how much immunity a person will develop after they have the virus.

Serology or antibody tests may be able to tell if you have been infected with the virus that causes COVID-19. Your body makes antibodies when it fights an infection. Antibody tests find antibodies in your blood. Antibody tests tell you if your immune system responded to the infection. Antibodies in your blood mean at one time you were exposed to COVID-19. An antibody test is done by taking a sample of blood. Your blood can be analyzed for two kinds of antibodies:

  • IgM antibodies which develop early in an infection
  • IgG antibodies which are more likely to show up later in the infection or after you’ve recovered from the infection

An antibody test is different from the test in which a healthcare worker uses a nasal swab to collect a sample of secretions from the uppermost part of your throat, behind your nose. This test is called a PCR test. A PCR test is used to diagnose someone with COVID-19. It tells you if you are sick with COVID-19 right now. 

For more information visit: CDC Serology Testing for COVID-19.

A: Because there are few scientific studies about how accurate COVID-19 antibody tests are, the results of antibody tests should not be used to confirm if you have COVID-19 or if you are immune to it. Right now, we don’t know if people who have recovered from COVID-19 or who have antibodies for it are immune and protected from getting COVID-19 again.

Current COVID-19 antibody tests are best used for scientific research. 

A: It takes about 7-10 days for COVID-19-related IgG antibodies to be detected in the blood of someone who is infected with the virus that causes COVID-19. Testing people who are not sick yet or who are very early in their infection can result in large numbers of false negative test results because they have not yet developed antibodies to the virus. A false negative test result means someone tested negative for COVID-19 but they actually have the disease. If you want to get an antibody test, you should wait at least 2 weeks after you had symptoms of COVID-19 or were in close contact with someone who tested positive for COVID-19. 

A: Antibody tests can be done by venous blood draw or a finger-prick. Antibody tests are unreliable with a small blood sample so venous blood draw is recommended over finger-prick tests. We don’t know how accurate finger-prick COVID-19 antibody tests are yet.

For both types of tests, it is best to use one that has been validated by a laboratory to the standards of state or federal regulatory bodies. Tests that have Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) status by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) are preferred over tests simply registered with the FDA for sale in the United States. An EUA means the test has been independently verified by the FDA. 

As of April 26, 2020, only four companies had received EUAs from the FDA for antibody tests but 107 other companies were selling antibody tests. An up-to-date list of companies with EUAs by test type can be found at https://www.fda.gov/medical-devices/emergency-situations-medical-devices/emergency-use-authorizations#covid19ivd

A: If an antibody test is positive and shows antibodies are in your blood, you were likely infected with COVID-19 and your immune system has responded. This does not guarantee you have immunity to the virus.

We don’t know how long COVID-19 antibodies will be present in the body or if they protect you from getting COVID-19 again. Because of this, it is important to still practice social distancing.

If you do get sick with symptoms of COVID-19 (like a fever, cough, shortness of breath, muscle aches, sore throat, or a decrease in your sense of smell or taste), you may need to be tested for COVID-19 with a PCR test. A PCR test is done by a healthcare worker who uses a nasal swab to collect a sample of secretions from the uppermost part of your throat, behind your nose. Call a healthcare provider or visit coronavirus.utah.gov/testing-locations/

A: If an antibody test is negative and shows no antibodies are in your blood, you were likely not infected with COVID-19, you may have been tested early in your infection, or your body has not made enough antibodies to be detected by the test. Because of this, it is important to still practice social distancing.

It takes about 7-10 days for COVID-19-related IgG antibodies to be detected in the blood of someone who is infected with the virus that causes COVID-19. Testing people who are not sick yet or who are very early in their infection can result in large numbers of false negative test results because they have not yet developed antibodies to the virus. This means, you could still be infected with COVID-19 even if your test result is negative, especially if you have been in contact with someone who tested positive for COVID-19 or you have symptoms of it.

If you get sick with symptoms of COVID-19 (like a fever, cough, shortness of breath, muscle aches, sore throat, or a decrease in your sense of smell or taste), you may need to be tested for COVID-19 with a PCR test. A PCR test is done by a healthcare worker who uses a nasal swab to collect a sample of secretions from the uppermost part of your throat, behind your nose. Call a healthcare provider or visit coronavirus.utah.gov/testing-locations/
A: Since we don’t know at this time if antibodies provide immunity against COVID-19, employers should not require their employees to have a positive antibody test in order to come back to work or reopen their business.


QUARANTINE AND ISOLATION QUESTIONS


A: Quarantine is for people who are not sick and don’t have any symptoms of COVID-19, but who may have been exposed to it. You may be asked to quarantine for 14 days if you have been exposed to the virus. If someone in your house tests positive you should quarantine. 

Public health is recommending anyone who has been asked to quarantine because they had an exposure to COVID-19 who is not sick/symptomatic be tested 5-7 days AFTER their last exposure. Those individuals will receive a referral code from the health department.

A: Self-isolation is for people who are already sick or have tested positive for COVID-19. Everyone who lives in your house should stay at home if someone in your house tests positive for COVID-19.

Self-isolation is for sick people who are not sick enough to be in the hospital. Your doctor may tell you to recover at home. Isolation keeps sick people away from healthy people to stop sickness from spreading. Even in your home, you should try to stay away from other people as much as possible. Stay at home EXCEPT to get medical care.

A: Isolation is a strategy that is used to help prevent the spread of infection. It simply means to separate someone who is sick from those who are not sick. Because COVID-19 can be spread from person-to-person, staying away from other people is critical to stop the virus from spreading. Individuals who test positive for COVID-19 or are sick are required to self isolate to help prevent the spread of infection.


Quarantine is a strategy that separates and restricts the movement of people who may have been exposed to a contagious disease, like COVID-19 from those who have not. You may be asked to be quarantined if you have been in close contact with someone who tested positive for COVID-19. Those who are quarantined, even if they are not sick, should stay away from others who have not been so exposed, to prevent the possible spread of the communicable disease.  If someone chooses to quarantine, it does not mean they have COVID-19. They are doing their part to slow the spread of the disease in our community in the event they later develop symptoms.


A: Those who are sick can protect their families and loved ones through voluntary home isolation. This means physically separating yourself from other people in your home by staying in a different room and using a different bathroom from other people in your house, if possible. If you need to be closer than six feet to someone, both should wear surgical masks. Do not use the same personal and household items as other people, wash hands frequently, and clean high touch surfaces. Self isolation will become the norm for people sick with COVID-19 who are not sick enough to be in the hospital.

A: Voluntary isolation and quarantine means that an individual is willing to comply with a health department requirement to either isolate or quarantine. At this time, we are operating under voluntary isolation and quarantine orders. Individuals have willingly self-isolated and quarantined so far. 


An involuntary isolation or quarantine would only happen if an individual is unwilling to comply with a health department requirement to do so and would be court ordered with law enforcement monitoring, while protecting personal privacy. Involuntary isolation and quarantine have not been enacted in our county.


A: No, you do not need to post a sign on your house. Some of us may remember the infamous measles signs posted on doors. This practice is no longer used in light of our newer health privacy laws and ethical best practices. Public health officials would never advise posting signage on a home to indicate individuals inside are infected. This type of indicator contributes to further isolation, fear, stigma, and potentially following incorrect protocols about disease reporting. This is especially true when community members are currently participating in voluntary quarantine. We do not need to contribute to isolation, fear, and stigma that COVID-19 has unfortunately created in our society.

A: We are still learning about this virus, but it appears that it can spread from people to animals in some situations. Until we learn more about this new coronavirus, you should restrict contact with pets and other animals while you are sick with COVID-19, just like you would with people. When possible, have another member of your household care for your animals while you are sick. If you are sick with COVID-19, avoid contact with your pet, including

  • petting
  • snuggling
  • being kissed or licked
  • sharing food or bedding

If you must care for your pet or be around animals while you are sick, wash your hands before and after you interact with pets and wear a cloth face covering.

You can learn more about Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidance by visiting: If You Have Animals and COVID-19 and Animals.

A: Because this is a new virus, many effects are still unknown. The Utah Department of Health and CDC have updated their language about this population as the pandemic has progressed. 

In a recent study, pregnant women were significantly more likely to be hospitalized, admitted to the intensive care unit, and receive mechanical ventilation than nonpregnant women; however, pregnant women were not at greater risk for death from COVID-19.  https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6925a1.htm?s_cid=mm6925a1_w&fbclid=IwAR2iwr-gv9gI4BwmY9rEJBIJOc_p3exM1FygeyfPsiCwnPceFdDHzzuPOz8

Additional information from CDC: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/pregnancy-breastfeeding.html

A: We do not know for sure if mothers with COVID-19 can spread the virus to babies in their breast milk, but the limited data available suggest this is not likely. Breast milk provides protection against many illnesses and is the best source of nutrition for most infants.

If you have COVID-19 and choose to breastfeed:

Wear a cloth face covering while breastfeeding and wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds before each feeding.

If you have COVID-19 and choose to express breast milk:
Use a dedicated breast pump (not shared).
Wear a cloth face covering during expression and wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds before touching any pump or bottle parts and before expressing breast milk.
Follow recommendations for proper pump cleaning [Español] after each use, cleaning all parts that come into contact with breast milk.
If possible, expressed breast milk should be fed to the infant by a healthy caregiver who does not have COVID-19, is not at high-risk for severe illness from COVID-19, and is living in the same home.

For more Utah frequently asked questions, please visit:

coronavirus.utah.gov/faq

Copyright © Davis County Government. All Rights Reserved

New Year's Day

Wednesday, Jan 01

Martin Luther King Jr. Birthday

Monday, Jan 20

President's Day

Monday, Feb 17

Memorial Day

Monday, May 25

Independence Day (Observed)

Friday, Jul 03

Pioneer Day

Friday, Jul 24

Labor Day

Monday, Sep 07

Veterans' Day

Wednesday, Nov 11

Thanksgiving

Thursday, Nov 26 & Friday, Nov 27

Christmas Day

Friday, Dec 25

Christmas Eve (Close at 2pm)

Friday, Dec 25

New Years Eve (Close at 2pm)

Thursday, Dec 31