A Science Book for Everyone

by Karen Walch | Sep 01, 2022

Non-fiction science, fictional science and science fiction. . .sometimes it's hard to tell the difference!

Tracking Pythons
by Kate Messner

Burmese Pythons come from Southeast Asia, and unwanted pets were probably dropped into the wild. Scientists estimate there are now tens of thousands in Southern Florida–maybe up to 300,000. They are the top of the food chain--starting with mice and rabbits, then moving on to raccoons, bobcats, mountain lions, deer. Author Kate Messner followed the scientists implementing a program to get rid of the pythons. This project implants radio signals into some male snakes who lead scientists to female snakes and their eggs. Informative text and descriptive photos.

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Chirp
by Kate Messner

This fictional chapter book tells the story of Mia and her family moving back to Vermont to live near Mia’s beloved grandmother the summer after seventh grade. Her grandmother owns a cricket farm where crickets are made into food . . . for humans! Grandmother feels certain someone is trying to sabotage the farm, so Mia is determined to help save it. Mia has courage to help solve the mystery of the cricket farm troubles, but it’s harder to have courage to face the secret she keeps inside. Other books by Messner: Time Rangers, Tracking Pythons, Over and Under the Pond.

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Bonus: read the eBook!

Bonus: listen to the eAudiobook!

The Big Book of the Blue       
by Yuval Zommer

This is the third book in Zommer’s popular non fiction series of big books. (The Big Book of Bugs is the first book in the series.) This book is filled with illustrations of slippery, scaly, and strange underwater animals accompanied by snippets of facts that are quick to read and fun to know. Children and adults will love this series.

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Project Mulberry
by Linda Sue Park

Julia Song and her best friend Patrick want to win a blue ribbon at the fair. They want to raise an animal, but are meeting roadblocks until Julia’s mother suggests they might try raising silkworms like she did as a child in Korea. Patrick is excited, but Song wants to do something more “American.” They both learn a thing or two about friendship and being American as they do the project. Also, between the chapters, Julia argues with the author, Linda Sue Park about changes Julia wants in the story. Linda Sue Park herself reads the author's part on audio.

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Bonus: read the eBook!

Bonus: listen to the eAudiobook!

Clues to the Universe
by Christina Li

Rosalind Ling Geraghty and Benjamin Burns (Ro and Benji) are the most unlikely of friends. Ro likes everything about science, and Benji draws through science class. But they start working on a rocket together for a science fair and their friendship grows–even as they face bullying, arguments, and even grief together.

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Bonus: listen to the eAudiobook!

 

See You in the Cosmos
by Jack Cheng

Eleven-year-old Alex Petroski loves space, rockets, his mother, his brother, and his dog, Carl Sagan (named after the famous astronomer who sent a Golden Record into deep space in 1977.) Alex wants to send a golden ipod into space at a rocket launch in New Mexico. On the train ride he records his adventure so the listeners in outer space can hear. Although Alex lives with a troubled mother and his brother has moved to another state, the book is full of optimism, hope, and friends willing to help Alex along the way. The audio book is well done, and performed by a full cast.

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Bonus: listen to the eAudiobook!

The Care and Feeding of a Pet Black Hole
by Michelle Cuevas

You might think the authors of this book and the previous one collaborated because they both include a great deal about Carl Sagan. Eleven year old Stella Rodriquez shows up at NASA to request that her recordings of her recently deceased dad’s voice be included in Carl Sagan’s Golden Record. On the way home, a black hole follows her, ready to be her pet. The black hole swallows everything it touches, including the class guinea pig she is watching. Stella wonders if she puts the memories of her dad in the black hole, will she stop hurting so much? Stella learns a lot about not letting grief consume her, and what really matters. And if you want to know how to keep a black hole for a pet–there are tips in the back of the book written by Stella herself.

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Bonus: listen to the eAudiobook!

Finn and the Intergalactic Lunchbox
by Michael Buckley

Finn and Lincoln are in the principal's office, and they have to stay there until they become friends. It’s hard to imagine that happening because Lincoln has been beating Finn up everyday. When lunchtime comes, the boys are given their backpacks and Finn retrieves his lunch to find he has his sister’s unicorn lunchbox–how embarrassing! But more importantly when Finn touches the lunchbox, there is a flash and Finn is jerked off his feet and sucked into a wormhole. He ends up in a battle with a civilization of seven foot locusts, and Finn and Lincoln become unlikely allies to save the world. Spoiler alert: the unicorns in this book are fierce warriors!

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Bonus: listen to the eAudiobook!

We’re Not from Here
by Geoff Rodkey

The settlers on Mars are almost out of food and oxygen is low. Returning to Earth is not an option because it may have blown up. Then the Zhuri, inhabitants of the planet Choon who are tall mosquito-like creatures, offer refuge to the Earthlings on their planet. The Earthlings make a 20-year voyage to Choon, only to find out the Zhuri don’t want them. Earthlings are too violent, and will destroy their peace. Lan's family is chosen to live on the planet as a test case. If they fail, all the immigrants from earth will be forced to leave. No pressure!

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Bonus: listen to the eAudiobook!

The Miscalculations of Lightning Girl
by Stacy McAnulty

When Lucy was struck by lightning at age 8, her brain was changed and she became a math genius. She has stayed at home for several years, being taught by her grandmother, but now her grandmother insists: she must attend middle school for one year, join one activity, and read one book that is not a math textbook. So how do you survive middle school? Is it okay to be super smart or is it better to look like you're the middle of the pack? Science or science fiction?

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Bonus: listen to the eAudiobook!

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