Share your Childhood

by Ellen Peterson | Mar 30, 2020

A list of classic children's books on video to share with your little ones.

The Snowy Day
by Ezra Jack Keats

A small boy's enchantment with a city's snowfall has him making snow angels and snowballs, sliding down snow mountains - and looking forward to going outside again.

 

 

Danny and the Dinosaur
by Syd Hoff

This is the story of a boy's friendship with a dinosaur and how they spend one happy day together.

 

 

Strega Nona
by Tomie dePaola

Big Anthony finds himself knee-deep in trouble - and pasta - when he uses Strega Nona's magic pasta pot without her permission.

 

 

Chicken Little
by Steven Kellogg

The classic story of Chicken Little and her bird-brained friends who think the sky is falling.

 

 

Harry The Dirty Dog
by Gene Zion

In this charming classic story, Harry, the little white dog with black spots, runs away before bath time and plays outside until he changes into a black dog with white spots.

 

 

Where The Wild Things Are
by Maurice Sendak

Max is the hero of this beloved children's classic in which he makes mischief, sails away, tames the wild things and returns home for supper.

 

 

Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs
by Judi Barrett

Residents of the Town of Chewandswallow, who receive meals daily from the benevolent skies, find their eating habits drastically changed when the weather takes a turn for the worse!

 

 

Curious George Rides A Bike
by H.A. Rey

Fans of the ingenious little monkey will not be disappointed as he embarks on a wild series of adventures in a traveling circus.

 

 

Officer Buckle & Gloria
by Peggy Rathmann

Officer Buckle knows more about safety than anyone in the town of Napville. But whenever he tries to share his safety tips, nobody listens - until the day the Napville Police Department buys a police dog named Gloria, who has her own way of demonstrating safety tips.

 

Make Way For Ducklings
by Robert McCloskey

In this timeless tale of family life, Mr. and Mrs. Mallard find the perfect spot to raise their young in Boston's Public Garden.

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