Graphic Novel Memoirs

by Karen Walch | Aug 14, 2021

If you think comic books are just for kids, think again. Graphic novels cover a wide range of topics for all ages. These insightful memoirs tackle difficult topics and the compelling artwork adds a creative, emotion-evoking element to important historical accounts.

Persepolis
by Marjane Satrapi.

An intelligent and outspoken only child, Satrapi--the daughter of radical Marxists and the great-granddaughter of Iran's last emperor--bears witness to a childhood uniquely entwined with the history of her country.

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Bonus: read the Sequel or the Persepolis and Persepolis II Combined!

Bonus: watch the DVD!

 

Good Talk
by Mira Jacob.

Like many six-year-olds, Mira Jacob's half-Jewish, half-Indian son, Z, has questions about everything. At first they are innocuous enough, but as tensions from the 2016 election spread from the media into his own family, they become much, much more complicated. Written with humor and vulnerability, this deeply relatable graphic memoir is a love letter to the art of conversation--and to the hope that hovers in our most difficult questions.

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March
by John Lewis.

March is a vivid first-hand account of John Lewis' lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis' personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement.

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Bonus: read the eBook!

 

Maus: A Survivor's Tale
by Art Spiegelman.

A brutally moving work of art—widely hailed as the greatest graphic novel ever written—Maus recounts the chilling experiences of the author’s father during the Holocaust, with Jews drawn as wide-eyed mice and Nazis as menacing cats.

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They Called Us Enemy
by George Takei.

In 1942, at the order of President Franklin D. Roosevelt, every person of Japanese descent on the west coast was rounded up and shipped to one of ten 'relocation centers', hundreds or thousands of miles from home, where they would be held for years under armed guard. They Called Us Enemy is Takei's firsthand account of those years behind barbed wire, the joys and terrors of growing up under legalized racism, his mother's hard choices, his father's faith in democracy, and the way those experiences planted the seeds for his astonishing future.

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Bonus: read the eBook!

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